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Solutions / Emergency Lighting

EMERGENCY LIGHTING

Introduction

The purpose of emergency lighting is to ensure the safety lighting is provided promptly, automatically and for a suitable time, in a specified area when the normal mains power supply to the usual lighting installation fails.

The overall objective of emergency escape lighting is to enable safe exit from a location and/or building in the event of failure of the mains’ normal supply.

The objective of escape route lighting is to enable the safe exit from a location or building for occupants by providing appropriate visual conditions and direction finding on escape routes, and in special locations, and to ensure that fire-fighting and safety equipment can be readily located and used.

The objective of open area (anti-panic) lighting is to reduce the likelihood of panic and to enable safe movement of occupants towards escape routes by providing appropriate visual conditions and direction finding.

The objective of high risk task area lighting is to contribute to the safety of people involved in a potentially dangerous process or situation and to enable proper shut down procedures to be carried out for the safety of other occupants of the location or the building.

A combination of different types of emergency lighting is likely to be needed in most buildings and a risk assessment should be carried out to identify the areas and locations, which will require emergency lighting and the type of installation needed.

Vision varies from person to person, both in the amount of light required to perceive an object clearly and in the time taken to adapt to the changes in the illuminance level. In general, older people need more light and take longer to adapt to A lower illuminance on hazard or escape routes.

Much anxiety and confusion can be alleviated by strategically placing emergency lighting luminaires and signs indicating the way out of a location or building. It is very important that exits are clearly signposted and are visible, whenever the location or building is occupied.


Definitions

It is a good idea to familiarise yourselves with some of the definitions used within the emergency lighting design, installation, commissioning and maintenance standards.

Escape route

A route designated for escape to a place of safety in the event of an emergency.

Emergency escape route lighting

That part of emergency escape lighting provided to ensure that the means of escape can be effectively identified and safely used at all times when the premises are occupied.

Open area (anti-panic)

Areas of undefined escape routes in halls or premises larger than 60m2 floor area or smaller areas if there is additional hazard such as use by a large number of people.

Emergency exit

A way out that is used during an emergency.

Final exit

The terminal point of an escape route.

Maintained emergency luminaire

Luminaire in which the emergency lighting lamps are energized at all times when normal lighting or emergency lighting is required.

Non-maintained emergency luminaire

Luminaire in which the emergency lighting lamps are in operation only when the mains supply to the normal lighting fails.

Required battery duration

Duration, in hours, of emergency operation of the battery required for the function

Rated duration of emergency operation

Time, in hours, as claimed by the manufacturer, that the rated emergency lumen output is provided.

High-risk task area lighting

That part of emergency escape lighting that provides illumination for the safety of people involved in a potentially dangerous area, process or situation and to enable proper shut down procedures for the safety of the operator and other occupants of the premises.
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